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Home / News / Church & Ministry / USA Today writer wants Dallas Cowboys to ban Promise Keepers
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USA Today writer wants Dallas Cowboys to ban Promise Keepers

The sports section of “USA Today” is at it again. In March, a columnist called for Oral Roberts University to be banned from the NCAA basketball tournament because of its Christian beliefs. Now another columnist wants the Dallas Cowboys to cancel the upcoming Promise Keepers conference because of the CEO’s biblical beliefs on sexuality.

Promise Keepers, a Christian men’s conference founded by college football coach Bill McCartney in 1990, is scheduled to hold the rally July 16-17 at AT&T Stadium, the home of the Dallas Cowboys. Tens of thousands of men are expected to attend. Mike Freeman, a sports columnist for “USA Today,” said Cowboys owner Jerry Jones and AT&T should make the event “disappear” because of recent comments by Promise Keepers CEO Ken Harrison.

Harrison, speaking to a radio program, discussed how the culture is negatively impacting men.

“One of the things they’re doing to make their agenda happen is destroying the identity of the American people, and if they can get Christians, especially Christian men, to sit down, be silent and be passive, then they can be effective,” Harrison said. “It’s working. Christian men are not standing up for what’s right. I mean, you think about how quickly we went from homosexual marriage to men putting on dresses, being called women and playing on women’s basketball teams. Where are the Christian men?”

Freeman argued that “comments like Harrison’s shouldn’t be anywhere near an NFL team. A company like AT&T shouldn’t be associated with them, either.”

“By allowing this conference to happen at one of football’s meccas, and by AT&T allowing it, they are helping to mainstream hate speech,” Freeman wrote. “If owner Jerry Jones, one of the most powerful men in all of sports, didn’t want the event to occur at the stadium, he could likely use his influence to make it disappear. Same with AT&T. The battle against this type of bigotry is fought, in part, on this level.”

Harrison stood by his comments in an interview with Freeman.

“Look, today’s culture is blurring the lines when it comes to sexual identity,” Harrison said. “Both Promise Keepers and I subscribe to a biblical worldview when it comes to male and female, and that’s one of the religious freedoms we celebrate in our nation. Sometimes we agree with culture, and sometimes we don’t.”

–Alan Goforth | Metro Voice

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