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Home / Faith / More than 30,000 men attend Promise Keepers Stadium event in Dallas
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More than 30,000 men attend Promise Keepers Stadium event in Dallas

Promise Keepers is back. More than 30,000 men attended last weekend’s conference at AT&T Stadium in Dallas.

The two-day event aimed to bring a positive message that would inspire transformation and empower men so they could return home equipped to lead their families, communities, and country.

Pastor A.R. Bernard of the Christian Cultural Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., told those in attendance, “Jesus can take a heart of hatred and turn it into a heart of love.” Hall of Fame wide receiver and former Cowboys player Michael Irvin prompted the men to, “Make sure you go to the owner’s manual, the Bible, to get your name and find your identity.” Psychologist Les Parrott pointed out, “Your relationships can only be as healthy as you are.”

David Closson, director of the Center for Biblical Worldview with the Family Research Council, said it was a powerful sight to see men committing their lives to Christ in such an extraordinary place.

“Here is a stadium known for football, but instead of beer and profanity, it was filled with men confessing their sins, praying and praising God,” he said. “It was encouraging to see men kneeling at the 50-yard line on the Dallas Cowboy star, surrounded by thousands of men on their knees, crying out to God. That stadium became a sanctuary.”

Promise Keepers shared heartwarming images on social media of young boys and men praying together: “Fathers, sons and brothers in the altars surrendering their lives to Christ and creating a new legacy for their families.”

Founded in 1990 by former University of Colorado football coach Bill McCartney, Promise Keepers is a movement that encourages men to be Christ-like leaders for their church and community. The massive men’s events from the 1990s had waned until the movement began making an online comeback in 2020 during the pandemic.

–Alan Goforth | Metro Voice

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